Cowboys

While there is a chapter in the Trigger second edition on his equine peers and their human counterparts, that subject is an entire book in itself. I strongly recommend Hollywood Hoofbeats by Petrine Day Mitchum. The individuals and steeds herein are all sadly gone, it’s now a silent trail. 

Clayton Moore, the screen’s definitive Lone Ranger, on tour with one of two Silvers used on television and movies.
Gene Autry with Champion and Little Champ. The singing cowboy used a number of horses during his career: dark bays, chestnuts, sorrels and even a touring palomino.
Legendary rodeo rider, character actor, stuntman, and second unit director Yakima Canutt. Truth be told, he was the real King of the Cowboys.
The great Buck Jones with yet another Hollywood Silver. The legend goes Jones was one of the almost 500 victims of the 1942 Coconut Grove fire in Boston. Some reports claim he escaped but went back into the burning building to save others and was trapped.
Rex Allen on his fabulous stud Koko, a horse managed by Glenn Randall.
Possibly stuntman Buddy Sherwood as Zorro riding Phantom in the Walt Disney television production show of Zorro.  
Gene Autry with his touring trick-horse palomino Robin Hood.
Don “Little Jug” Reynolds on Little Champ with Gene Autry on Champion in the Beyond the Purple Hills. Reynolds could ride as well as most adults.
Stuntman Joe Yrigoyen is best known for doubling Roy Rogers and for driving the Messala chariot in Ben-Hur
Warner Bros. singing cowboy Dick Foran on his wonderful screen mount Smoke.
The Lone Ranger and Silver!
Bob Livingston on Silver, the second man to play the Lone Ranger on the big screen before Clayton Moore took over the role on television. 
Leo “Pancho” Carrillo on his blue-eyed palomino Loco.
Guy Williams, aka Don Diego de la Vega/Zorro, on Phantom, the second stallion he rode in the Disney television series. 
The Lone Ranger and Tonto on Silver and Scout, “Hi Yo Silver Away!”
The great Tom Mix on Tony, one of the first western movie wonder horses.
Silver snuggles up to the Lone Ranger. They were such a handsome pair. 
Gene Autry with Champion 2, star of The Strawberry Roan. Johnny Agee, his trainer, was no doubt close by. 
Like any good horseman, the Lone Ranger took special care of Silver’s hooves. 
Gene Autry with the original Champion.
“The Bells of Rosarita” with Bob Livingston, Alan Lane, Roy Rogers (on Little Trigger), Don “Red” Barry and Sunset Carson.
George “Gabby” Hayes on his ever-reliable bay gelding Eddie.
The great Buck Jones and Silver.
Allan “Rocky” Lane with Blackjack.
Roy Rogers and Rex Allen with Koko
Hoppy and Topper at the Macy’s Parade in NYC with Mighty Mouse looking on.
Lee Powell as the Lone Ranger in 1939 working at a circus, Lone Ranger Inc eventually stopped him.
Buster Crabbe and Falcon
Lee Powell the first actor to portray The Lone Ranger on film in the 1938 Republic movie serial based on the radio program
Alan ”Rocky” Lane with Blackjack and his double. What a handsome group they were. When his on-camera acting roles dried up Lane became the voice of Mr. Ed on television (Roy Dillow Collection).
Legendary Hollywood horse trainer Ralph McCutcheon with his fabulous overo paint Dice, co-star of Duel In The Sun.
Robert Livingston in the Republic serial The Lone Ranger Rides Again (1939) riding Silver Chief, originally owned by cowboy star Buck Jones. The horse was then called Silver B and later renamed Cactus for a series of Sunset Carson westerns.
Clayton Moore on Silver, with a lasso rather than a six-shooter in his hand. 
Duncan Reynaldo/the Cisco Kid on Diablo in the traditional rearing pose.
The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold, in 1958.
Ace action cowboy Wild Bill Elliot could really sit a horse.
Lee Powell riding Silver in The Lone Ranger serial for Republic Pictures. Powell was the first actor to play the masked man on screen, preceded by Brace Beemer who first played the Lone Ranger on radio.

Gene Autry on Champ Jr in the rearing pose, something he did not attempt very often. One would be hard-pressed to find him doing the stunt in movies or his television show. 
Duncan Reynaldo as the Cisco Kid, with his overo paint horse Diablo. As was the norm, he used two horses in his television show.
Clayton Moore/The Lone Ranger with Silver.
Gene Autry on Champion, Frog Milhouse on Ring-Eyed Nellie, and Tadpole. 
Guy Williams as Zorro on Tornado at a Disneyland park parade in 1959 when the weekly television show was at its peak.
Tyrone Power and Tornado in The Mark of Zorro, an American black-and-white swashbuckling adventure film from 20th Century Fox, 1940. 
Lash LaRue riding Black Diamond. The pair was mostly about mystique: the black outfit, the whip, the name.
Ray “Crash” Corrigan, the man who may have sold Little Trigger to Roy Rogers.
Hopalong Cassidy and Topper with fans.
Don “Jug” Reynolds; Little Beaver; mid 1940s.
The genuine articles, Ben Johnson with the amazing Steel, a much sought-after Fat Jones movie cast horse.
The legendary Lone Ranger on Silver in the dramatic rearing pose. A former acrobat, Clayton Moore was very adept in the saddle.
Duke on Duke. John Wayne on his horse Duke.
Hopalong Cassidy and Topper
Buck Jones and Silver
Rocky Lane and Blackjack
On the Range Ryder set with Gene Autry, Champion, Jock Mahoney and Dick Jones.
​Roy Rogers with his favorite star Hoot Gibson during a War Bond Drive in the early 40’​s​. Hoot​ ​was ​also ​at the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre ceremony​ when Rogers and Trigger p​laced their hands/hooves in cement. ​(Roy Dillow Collection)
Wild Bill Elliot as Red Ryder!
Ray “Crash” Corrigan, film actor, stuntman, and owner of Corriganville Ranch, Simi Valley, CA.
Bob Wills and Punkin
Clayton Moore rearing Silver in 1972 at 58 years old.